Comparing Alcovit to Other Remedies

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Jan. 25, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Thriving in the realms of automotive manufacturing, farming, financial services, and technological development, German imports have achieved much success in the United States. That said, the European superpower is about to add another entry to its list of economic gains with the upcoming U.S. release of Alcovit.

Currently available internationally as a potent anti-hangover supplement, Alcovit offers consumers the chance to fully invest in a night of casual social drinking, without the fear of alcohol’s negative after-effects the next day. It may still be a little while before everyone can fully gather at pre-COVID levels, but Alcovit will soon be on the market for Americans.

Alcovit is a creation of German Healthcare¬†company, Biotake GmbH, but it isn’t the first hangover remedy to hit the world stage. There’s always been brave (and sometimes drunk) individuals who’ve crafted homemade solutions, special mixtures, odd elixirs, and good old-fashioned trial-and-error experiments that have either been touted by various homeopathic outlets or shared by online sources. Sometimes, these homegrown cures work, but they’re not always consistent. Remedies that have received a lot of press as of late, however, are supplements containing L-Cysteine. This amino acid can often be found in dairy, protein, and some bread products. When isolated, it is believed that L-Cysteine can support the liver’s natural detoxification process (https://www.verywellhealth.com/l-cysteine-supplement-hangover-5075746). Such a process is physiologically impossible:¬†One cannot enhance the liver function in order to speed up the natural detoxification processes!

L-Cysteine’s capabilities were touted in a recent Finnish study(https://www.foodandwine.com/news/hangover-cure-finnish-researchers). The test subjects, all adult men, were given a concoction of grain alcohol and cranberry juice. The quantity of drinks that each subject imbibed was determined by their body weight. Afterward, they were given placebo, a 600 mg pill containing L-Cysteine, or a 1200 mg L-Cysteine pill. Those who were administered the 1200 mg pill reported a less significant hangover, and those who received the smaller dose also expressed experiencing reduced hangover symptoms.

It should be noted, though, that some medical experts have called this study into question. The sample size was limited to Finnish males. Gender, age, and other demographics could very well yield different conclusions. Also, the results – in which the men reported less aches and nausea than they normally would experience – were subjective. Contrast that with the results of a 2009 study – in which subjects given Alcovit exhibited a decreased blood alcohol level – and it’s clear that Alcovit’s international reach is supported by its scientific certifications. These credentials would likely make it popular in American medicine cabinets.

Alcovit utilizes a special, proprietary mixture of vitamins and nutrients (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, C, D3, E, biotin, folic acid, and pyridoxine hydrochloride) as well as mineral silicate – which binds with alcohol molecules and dilutes their ability to inflict a hangover. Approved in the European Union as a class IIa medical device, Alcovit might be the answer for which many social drinkers have been searching.

Sources
Biotake GmbH

https://www.foodandwine.com/news/hangover-cure-finnish-researchers

https://www.verywellhealth.com/l-cysteine-supplement-hangover-5075746

Please direct inquiries to:
Kalie Baise
(954) 788-4393

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SOURCE Alcovit